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How to hire a rising star

As a business manager you are always on the look-out for the next "rising star" to hire for your company. This person is the kind of worker that every business person dreams of having, or even becoming one themselves. A rising star is an employee with the right kind of skills for the job. They are well educated and talented, and also have the kind of attitude you're looking for in an employee. They are passionate about what your business does and for them, work is more than just a paycheck.

A good way to be on the look-out for a rising star is by looking into the academic background of your potential employees. The type of major that they had in college, the types of classes they took and the kinds of extra-curricular activities they participated in are indicative of the type of worker they will become. The type of school they attended may also be a mark of their status as a rising star. An applicant who attended a well-known party school may be less of a rising star than an applicant who attended a prestigious Ivy League school.

Remember that grades are not everything. For example, an applicant may have received average grades at a prominent school and yet be more qualified than an applicant that received outstanding grades at an inferior school. Or perhaps the potential employee did not receive very high marks at all, but has shown impressive talent and progress in all previously held positions in the work force.

Obviously you would also want to inquire into the applicants' previous types of employment before deciding to hire your rising star. If your applicant has had a wide variety of jobs but has excelled in each and every position held, (for example, moving up from sales associate to manager in a period of 1 year) the applicant may be showing signs of becoming your rising star. However, you may find an applicant that has had good jobs in the past, but never seems to progress within the company. This applicant may be a good employee and hard worker, but not enough to become your rising star.

Perhaps you have not yet received applications from anyone that hints at becoming a rising star. You must be prepared to search for them. First, you must be the kind of company a star would want to work for. Be willing to advertise for new workers in ways you may not have previously done (recruit at local colleges or even local businesses). Next, you must be able to offer your rising star benefits and wages that will entice them enough to work for you. The type of person who is a rising star will have many job offers from many locations. You must be able to tempt the rising star away from other companies.

Sometimes, unbeknownst to you, your rising stars are already working for you. They simply need a small nudge from you to become the great employee that you're looking for. However, you must be willing to train and mold these employees until they demonstrate their true abilities and talents. You may want to create leadership programs within the company to seek out the next rising star. In doing this you may find that a certain employees will surprise you with their skills. Employees that you never thought of as stars of the company may only need the opportunity to show you their aptitude and strengths. Then you may be able to hire or promote these people to new positions that will enable them to become your next rising star.

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