business articles business management businesses Marketing sales Technology Business finance Lean Manufacturing small business Investing articles employee health
Search This Site
Custom Search

How to manage a task force

In the world of business, a task force is often created to help achieve a certain goal or project. Some task forces are temporary, while other task forces are more of a permanent position. As a business manager, you have a very interesting job in trying to manage a task force. There are a lot of different situations and problems that can arrive by working with a task force, instead of a managing a regular position within the business. Here are a couple of tips on how to manage a task force as a business manager:

 Be completely familiar with the task at hand: This seems like it should be a no-brainer tip to a lot of managers, but your familiarity with the task force's project cannot be emphasized enough! There is a good chance that most of the problems and questions that arise within your task force project are going to happen either because the program is new, the employees are unfamiliar with the project, or the scope of the task force is not well defined. As the business manager, you need to know when to set the limits and when to "call the shots." Before you even undertake the responsibility of a task force, make sure that you know exactly what you will be dealing with.

 Set goals: There are lots of different business management strategies that deal with goals, and you will want to consider doing one of them while managing a task force. Just like any other job, the task force needs to reach certain goals and improve their performance. By setting goals, you will be able to keep your employees focused on their work and striving for improvement. If you don't have goals like that, then a job becomes pointless or boring - which leads to employees becoming discontent. Instead, use goals to help keep people happy and on track. One of the great business management strategies which incorporates goals is the "Three A's" method - Aim, Act, and Assess.
 Have the responsibilities of each "force" member defined: When managing a task force, you are going to need every single person to pull their own weight. Each person needs to be completely sure of his or her responsibilities. The best thing that you can do to easily set responsibilities and roles is to assign them at the first task force meeting. This way, everyone in the task force will be able to clearly see the responsibilities of each member, and you also will be able to avoid any confusion of roles as soon as the force begins to work.
 Don't talk about "the end" of the project if possible: If you are managing a task force, one of the worst things that you can do is talk about the task force in a short-term context. Instead, you should always be focusing on the work that needs to get done, motivating the other task members to keep on working. If you begin to talk about when the project will end or slow down, then you will begin to partially lose the leadership position that you have as a manager. Remember, as a leader, you want to be pulling people along and constantly focused on the work at hand (instead of reminding the task force that one day you are not going to be leading them anymore!).

Managing a task force is a unique and creative job, and it is always fun to be involved in an intense project like a task force. Just remember to keep your task force organized and focused on the project at hand, and you will have a lot of success in your task force project!

Search our site for more information:

Rate This Post
  • Currently 4.5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 4.5/5 (2 votes cast)

FREE: Get More Leads!
How To Get More LeadsSubscribe to our free newsletter and get our "How To Get More Leads" course free via email. Just enter your first name and email address below to subscribe.
First Name *
Email *


Get More Business Info
Business Info
Marketing and Sales
Technology
Finance
Manufacturing
Small Business
Investing
Employee Health and Fitness


Sponsored Links
Recent Articles

Categories

Search This Site
Search This Site
Custom Search

Syndicate This Information
Syndicate This Site!   Syndicate This Site!   Syndicate This Site!


Copyright © 2003-2010 by BusinessKnowledgeSource.com - All Rights Reserved
Privacy Policy, Terms of Use